clmr
'It is not her world or her time, but her art, that is approachable, today or tomorrow.' - Eudora Welty

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When they all sat down it was better; to her taste a great deal better, for Frank Churchill grew talkative and gay, making her his first object. Every distinguishing attention that could be paid, was paid to her. To amuse her, and be agreeable in her eyes, seemed all that he cared for - and Emma, glad to be enlivened, not sorry to be flattered, was gay and easy too, and gave him all the friendly encouragement, the admission to be gallant, which she had ever given in the first and most animating period of their acquaintance; but which now, in her own estimation, meant nothing, though in the judgment of most people looking on it must have had such an appearance as no English word but flirtation could very well describe. “Mr. Frank Churchill and Miss Woodhouse flirted together excessively.” They were laying themselves open to that very phrase - and to having it sent off in a letter to Maple Grove by one lady, to Ireland by another. Not that Emma was gay and thoughtless from any real felicity; it was rather because she felt less happy than she had expected. She laughed because she was disappointed; and though she liked him for his attentions, and thought them all, whether in friendship, admiration, or playfulness, extremely judicious, they were not winning back her heart.


Anonymous asked:
austenland or lost in austen

i can’t give a one title answer to this question

the first time i watched Lost in Austen, i fell in love with it. and let’s not forget the cast they assembled: Hugh Bonneville, Alex Kingston, Lindsay Duncan, Guy Henry. some real British acting royalty (but kudos to Austenland for getting Rupert Vansittart the original Mr Hurst as dodgy Wattles). i was particularly obsessed with that final scene between Amanda and Darcy and would watch it on repeat before i had to go to school. before i had to go to schoolit was a problem. the twist in the Wickham/Georgiana, Jane/Collins stories, the introduction of the Collins brothers, the Lydia/Bingley dash…it all felt fresh to me, though silly (because let’s face it, there’s no logic in secret worlds behind the bathroom plumbing or public loos). but i think silly is what an Austen x Narnia in the cupboard type adaptation should be. taking it too seriously and the view that it blasphemes Austen’s original work never entered my mind. the similar silliness of Austenland helped me appreciate it as an endearingly over the top fan letter to Jane Austen’s most popular novel. i liked the idea of the Austenland experience. though like its main character says, it seems a bit wrong to have paid actors try to convince you you’re in love - but hey i’ll try to embrace it as part of its overall silliness. and an extra note about Elizabeth Charming and Amelia - some lines i found hilarious the first time - on repeated viewings, they’re painful to watch. i literally laughed out loud at Amanda’s lines. call me a simpleton or easily entertained but it’s true. claude you’re kidding, bumface, i’ve got an itch. Jane Erstwhile’s it’s hot in here and ninja number got a chuckle but Amanda’s Elizabeth wins the funnies for me.

can i talk about the Darcys? i’m going to talk about the Darcys. after watching Lost, one lunchtime, my friend and i ranked portrayals of darcy from favourite to least favourite because let’s face it, that was more fun than talking to actual rl boys. as much as Colin was able to steal my heart, he took 4 hours longer than Matthew took to do so (and tbh i believed the sexual tension and the chemistry between Keira and Matthew more than i did between Jennifer and Colin. please don’t misunderstand me - i adore 1995’s Pride for different reasons c.f. 2005. but if ever there were an otp between me and a movie/series, it would be 2005 Pride) and so i ranked Matthew first and Colin second. Elliot’s Darcy in Lost, i put second also. he does a very good smoulder. and then there’s the lake scene. JJ’s Darcy never got to take a dip (yes, he gets to ride in the rain but he already did that in Northanger so minus points - seen it before. don’t get me wrong - i liked the riding in the rain. i liked it a lot. but i demand a body of water) and i think that’s really the only reason he comes third. Olivier’s Darcy comes third too and only because i have mixed feelings about 50s Pride - as a standalone movie, i.e. with no novel background, it’s a good movie, but as an Austen adaptation, I’m not so sure..I’ll say more about this in another reply/post another day.

there’s a lot more i want to say and i’ve glossed terribly over what i should delve into more but i think this will do for now. so in short, my answer is Lost in Austen.



dear-austen asked:
What's your favorite Austen novel?

it is a truth universally acknowledged that Pride and Prejudice is, and always will be, my jam





charlesmmacaulay:

endless list of favourite books
↳ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you.” 

charlesmmacaulay:

endless list of favourite books

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you.” 


Clueless is just the most beautiful intersection of 19th century British literature and kilts.
— Leonora Epstein +


weloveperioddrama:

 ”He was more obviously struck and confused by the sight of her than she had ever observed before; he looked quite red. For the first time since their renewed acquaintance, she felt that she was betraying the least sensibility of the two. She had the advantage of him in the preparation of the last few moments. All the overpowering, blinding, bewildering, first effects of strong surprise were over with her. Still, however, she had enough to feel! It was agitation, pain, pleasure, a something between delight and misery. “


'Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley. 
She hesitated a moment, and then replied, ‘With you, if you will ask me.’
'Will you?' said he, offering his hand.
'Indeed, I will'.



get to know me:  [1/?] favourite relationships

Jane Hayes and Henry Nobley // Austenland
"Jane, you are my fantasy."